Humblebragging is MORE irritating than outright boasting

0
26


It is the favourite strategy of celebrities who want to show off about their fame and money while still appearing ‘down to Earth’.

But the humblebrag may not be as subtle as they had hoped.

A new study shows it makes people less likeable because it makes them look insincere when compared to outright boasting. 

It is the favourite strategy of celebrities, such as Taylor Swift, who want to show off about their fame and money while still appearing ‘down to Earth’. But the humblebrag may not be as subtle as they had hoped. A new study shows it makes people less likeable

It is the favourite strategy of celebrities, such as Taylor Swift, who want to show off about their fame and money while still appearing ‘down to Earth’. But the humblebrag may not be as subtle as they had hoped. A new study shows it makes people less likeable

A ‘humblebrag’, most often seen on social media sites, is a boast which is disguised as a humble statement or complaint.

An often-cited example is Stephen Fry writing on Twitter: ‘Oh dear. Don’t know what to do at the airport. Huge crowd but I’ll miss my plane if I stop and do photos.. oh dear, don’t want to disappoint.’

However the humblebrag is actually less popular than outright, unashamed boasting, a study led by the University of North Carolina found.

People faced by someone humblebragging were less likely to help them out by signing a petition, and also gave them less money. 

Humblebraggers are disliked, the authors conclude, because they are seen as ‘insincere’.

Lead author Dr Ovul Sezer told New Scientist: ‘Even though bragging is frowned upon, at least it comes across as sincere. Humblebragging, on the other hand, is a sneaky, strategic thing, and people see straight through it.’

The US researchers took real-life tweets by celebrities and asked people how much they liked the person based on what they said.

Kylie Jenner's best friend and model Jordyn Woods put this image of her on Instagram positioned in front of her BMW with the caption: 'I really be in sweats everyday'. Scientists say humblebrags such as this are more irritating than outright boasts

Kylie Jenner's best friend and model Jordyn Woods put this image of her on Instagram positioned in front of her BMW with the caption: 'I really be in sweats everyday'. Scientists say humblebrags such as this are more irritating than outright boasts

Kylie Jenner’s best friend and model Jordyn Woods put this image of her on Instagram positioned in front of her BMW with the caption: ‘I really be in sweats everyday’. Scientists say humblebrags such as this are more irritating than outright boasts

These included a tweet by British television presenter Cat Deeley, who wrote online: ‘So I have to go to both Emmy awards!! … Two dresses!!!?!?!’ This was turned into a straightforward brag when the academics changed it into: ‘I am going to both Emmy awards.’

WHAT IS A HUMBLEBRAG? 

A ‘humblebrag’, most often seen on social media sites, is a boast which is disguised as a humble statement or complaint.

An often-cited example is Stephen Fry writing on Twitter: ‘Oh dear. Don’t know what to do at the airport. Huge crowd but I’ll miss my plane if I stop and do photos.. oh dear, don’t want to disappoint.’

Jared Leto recently stated: ‘Just won GQ style award in Germany. Obviously they made a mistake. I wonder how long till they come take it back.’  

Television presenter Cat Deeley, who also wrote online: ‘So I have to go to both Emmy awards!! … Two dresses!!!?!?!’ This was turned into a straightforward brag when the academics changed it into: ‘I am going to both Emmy awards.’

Another humblebrag by American band Counting Crows, stated: ‘Seriously? 2 headlines in 1 day? Only me. I should enter a contest.’

Humblebraggers are disliked because they are seen as ‘insincere’ as those who outright boast about their achievements. 

The study also used a tweet by the American band Counting Crows, stating: ‘Seriously? 2 headlines in 1 day? Only me. I should enter a contest.’ As a brag, this said: ‘2 headlines in 1 day. Only me.’

The researchers asked 403 people to rate the comments, finding they liked the the humblebrag less than the boast.

When asked to give money to the authors of the statements, the brag got $1.05 (78 pence), compared to just 70 cents (52 pence) for the humblebrag.

Humblebragging, the authors state, comes from our need to be liked.

People naturally want to boast, to get respect for their competence, but they also want to be liked and worry showing off will not achieve that.

The solution is to disguise the boast as a complaint, which elicits sympathy, or as humility, which evidence shows makes people more likeable.

The example given by New Scientist, which reported the study results on its website, is Hollywood actor Jared Leto stating: ‘Just won GQ style award in Germany. Obviously they made a mistake. I wonder how long till they come take it back.’

The US research, which took in seven separate studies, asked 113 people to fill out a diary on humblebrags they heard in real life, and 45 per cent heard one over the course of a week.

The technique is used most to boast about people’s looks, followed by their money and wealth and then their performance at work. 

Most people exposed to humblebrags said they came from their friends and co-workers.

The study also used a tweet by the American band Counting Crows, stating: ‘Seriously? 2 headlines in 1 day? Only me'. The authors conclude: ‘We show that people choose to deploy humblebrags, particularly when motivated to both elicit sympathy and impress others

The study also used a tweet by the American band Counting Crows, stating: ‘Seriously? 2 headlines in 1 day? Only me'. The authors conclude: ‘We show that people choose to deploy humblebrags, particularly when motivated to both elicit sympathy and impress others

The study also used a tweet by the American band Counting Crows, stating: ‘Seriously? 2 headlines in 1 day? Only me’. The authors conclude: ‘We show that people choose to deploy humblebrags, particularly when motivated to both elicit sympathy and impress others

The study, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found fewer than two-thirds of people were willing to sign the petition of someone who had humblebragged to them.

This was when faced by a woman who said: ‘That’s cool! I got my dream internship and got funding to travel to Paris. Ugh, it’s so hard to decide which one to choose.’

But when she left off the last sentence, making it a boast rather than a humblebrag, 85 per cent of people signed her petition.

The authors conclude: ‘We show that people choose to deploy humblebrags, particularly when motivated to both elicit sympathy and impress others.

‘Despite the belief that combining bragging with complaining or humility confers the benefits of each strategy, we find that humblebragging confers the benefits of neither, instead backfiring because it is seen as insincere.’

 





Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here