How the weather affects your baby’s future salary

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If you’re pregnant you might want to think twice about going on a hot beach holiday, according to a controversial new study.

The study claims that for each day spent in 32°C (89°F) heat or more a baby’s future earnings fall by 0.1 per cent.

However it’s not all bad – air conditioning completely mitigates these damaging effects, according to researchers.

Experts not involved with the research were skeptical of the study’s findings and noted that the impact of high temperature during pregnancy on income as an adult are extremely small. 

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If you're pregnant you might want to think twice about going on a hot beach holiday, according to a controversial new study. The study claims that for each day spent in 32°C (89°F) heat or more a baby's future earnings fall by 0.1 per cent (stock image) 

If you’re pregnant you might want to think twice about going on a hot beach holiday, according to a controversial new study. The study claims that for each day spent in 32°C (89°F) heat or more a baby’s future earnings fall by 0.1 per cent (stock image) 

WHAT ARE THE MAIN CLAIMS?

The study has claimed that for each day spent in 32C heat or more an unborn baby’s future earnings fall by 0.1 per cent.

Researchers claim each day spent at this temperature resulted in $30 (£22) lost by the time the individual reaches thirty years old. 

However, experts were sceptical of the study’s findings and noted that the impact of high temperature during pregnancy on income as an adult are extremely small.

‘This study belongs to a growing body of work which increasingly seeks to blame any issues in later life on the environment of a mother’s womb’, Clare Murphy, director of external affairs at the British Pregnancy Advisory Service told MailOnline.

‘We need to be extremely careful that studies such as these, with either very small or preliminary findings, do not get translated into more rules and strictures about what women can and cannot do while pregnant.’

Researchers from University of California, Berkeley looked at the earnings of 12 million Americans born between 1969 and 1977. 

With each person they linked their salary when they turned 30 to the temperature in the area where they were born, writes The Times

Scientists, led by Dr Adam Isen, wanted to study the ‘long-run effects of temperature on measures of individuals’ economic well-being around age 30 years’, according to the paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 

Throughout pregnancy and during the first year of life temperatures above 28°C impact future earnings, researchers claim.   

‘We find that adult economic outcomes are negatively correlated with prenatal exposure to days with mean temperatures exceeding 32°C’, the researchers wrote in their paper.

Researchers claim each day spent at this temperature results in $30 (£22) lost by the time the individual reaches thirty years old.

But scientists say air conditioning dramatically reduces the potential damage of hot weather on an unborn child.

‘The effect only kicks in at extremely high temperatures (over 32°C), and then is only worth an average penalty of $30 (£22) a year for each day at this exposure when in utero or just born’, Dr David Spiegelhalter a British statistician and professor at the University of Cambridge told MailOnline.

Researchers claim each day spent at this temperature results in $30 (£22) lost by the time the individual reaches thirty years old (stock image)

Researchers claim each day spent at this temperature results in $30 (£22) lost by the time the individual reaches thirty years old (stock image)

Researchers claim each day spent at this temperature results in $30 (£22) lost by the time the individual reaches thirty years old (stock image)

‘So very interesting scientifically, and we know it’s not great to have babies at that temperature, but the effect is tiny and people should not start worrying’, he said. 

Experts warned that the study was certainly not a reason to cancel a hot holiday while pregnant. 

‘This study belongs to a growing body of work which increasingly seeks to blame any issues in later life on the environment of a mother’s womb’, Clare Murphy, director of external affairs at the British Pregnancy Advisory Service told MailOnline.

‘We need to be extremely careful that studies such as these, with either very small or preliminary findings, do not get translated into more rules and strictures about what women can and cannot do while pregnant.’

 





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